Is California prepared?

A man walks amid the debris of a destroyed car and buildings after the devastating earthquake in Pedernales, Ecuador, Sunday, April 24, 2016. The earthquake damage has added to the already heavy economic hardships being felt in this OPEC nation because of a collapse in world oil prices. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

BY XITLALY RUIZ

STUDENT CONTRIBUTOR

In less than a week the world saw a series of earthquakes from Japan to the South American nation of Ecuador. The central coast of Ecuador was struck by a 7.8 magnitude quake April 16.  This unfortunate event caused the death of at least 500 people and left 4,500 others injured and without a home. After a tragedy like this, one may wonder if California is prepared for a tragedy of this magnitude?

California residents have been told that the “big one” is coming for years now, and it’s no joke since the last “big” earthquake California experienced was in 1690, estimated at 7.7 magnitude.  With the San Andreas fault crossing through the Coachella Valley’s backyard, “[We] Are the most likely place to host a big earthquake,” said Tom Jordan, director of the Southern California Earthquake Center. Even after all these warnings and overly dramatized movies, experts warn that the Coachella Valley, as a community, is not prepared to handle an earthquake that strong. “We have come a long way. We have done a lot. But we still have a way to go,” stated Lucy Jones, seismologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena. The big one has been projected to leave at least 1,800 dead, 50,000 injuries and $200 billion in damage.

So how can one prepare for such event? According to a story in the “Los Angeles Daily News,” California residents should have an emergency kit with basic items such as:

  • Water
  • Canned food
  • First aid supplies
  • Kitchen items
  • Tools (flashlight, pocket knife, Radio, Batteries)
  • Extra clothing (diapers, sweaters)
  • Bedding
  • Household documents
  • Contact numbers

 

For more information on how to be prepared or other inquires you can contact the Southern California Earthquake center at (213)740-5843 or visit their website at: www.scec.org

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