Two presidential candidates suspend campaigns following Indiana primary

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and his wife, Heidi, wave to supporters during a primary night campaign event, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Indianapolis. Cruz ended his presidential campaign, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump's march to the Republican nomination. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and his wife, Heidi, wave to supporters during a primary night campaign event, Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Indianapolis. Cruz ended his presidential campaign, eliminating the biggest impediment to Donald Trump’s march to the Republican nomination.

 

BY HARRY LIMONADI

CURRENT AFFAIRS EDITOR

Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich both announced the suspension of their campaigns shortly after Republican candidate Donald Trump won the Indiana primary by a large margin on May 3.

This move leaves Trump as the single remaining Republican candidate, which indicates a high probability that he will become the Republican presidential nominee, though he is still 184 delegates short of officially winning the nomination.

In the weeks leading up to the Indiana primary, Cruz had used several unusual tactics in a bid to gain a decisive edge over Trump. Unexpectedly, on April 24, Cruz and Kasich’s campaigns announced a strategic partnership in order to deny Trump the nomination, though it turned out to be short-lived.

In addition, Cruz had prematurely named his vice presidential candidate, Carly Fiorina, on April 27, seemingly in a move to regain lost momentum after facing losses in multiple states in the week before.

Despite ending his presidential campaign, Cruz may yet still have a future in the next White House Administration.

Though disparaging Cruz with names like “Lyin’ Ted” numerous times in the preceding months, in an interview with Bill O’Reilly on Fox News, Trump stated that there was no bad blood between the two, and that Cruz potentially becoming his vice presidential candidate was, “something we can think about.”

The same goes for former Republican candidate John Kasich. Speaking highly of Kasich regarding his potential as a vice presidential running mate, Trump remarked that, “well, I would certainly consider him. I mean, he’s someone that I’ve gotten along with. During the debates, during intermission, I always seem to be talking to John.”

In addition, The New York Times reports that former contenders Chris Christie and Ben Carson have expressed interest in running alongside Trump in the upcoming 2016 presidential elections.

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