Textbooks: Should students buy or rent?

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“It’s because the books may come in a newer edition, or the instructor may not require using the book for the class.”

By GARRETT WILSON

STUDENT CONTRIBUTOR                                                      

At the beginning of every semester, College of the Desert students head to the bookstore to purchase textbooks for their classes. Students have two options: They can either buy or rent them, but not all textbooks are rentable.

Regan King, a COD bookstore associate says, “The reason why some books are not rentable is because they may not have an access code.”  Juan Palencia also works at the bookstore. He says “another reason some books are not offered online is that they are loose-leaf books with no hard cover, they need a binder and cannot be put online. Both King and Palencia make a good point about the textbook policy. Some students may wish to not buy any books, because it’s more expensive to buy or they no longer need the book anymore.

Students say buying books requires more money out of their pockets, and they sometimes have difficult times selling them back to the bookstore. The problem with trying to sell the books back is that they do not always buy them back. Palencia said, “It’s because the books may come in a newer edition, or the instructor may not require using the book for the class.”

Buying textbooks can be a hassle for some students, but renting them can also be frustrating. For example, the bookstore may not want the books back because they might have watermarks or just be in overall bad condition. When students rent textbooks, they sign an agreement promising to return the books in the same condition as when they first rented them.

Buying or renting textbooks is a decision most students will have to make. Surely there are positives and negatives with buying or renting, but students should make sure they understand and weigh out their options before making a decision.

 

 

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